What can I say instead of I am fine?

Ways to say that you are well.I’m fine thank you.I feel great / marvellous / fine.Couldn’t be better.Fit as a fiddle.Very well, thanks.Okay.Alright.Not bad.

What can I ask instead of what’s wrong?

It makes people internalize that the emotions they are feeling are wrong, and in turn, they ask others “what’s wrong?”. It is a never-ending circle. Instead, we should be saying things like “what happened?” , “What’s going on?” , or “How are you feeling?” in a tone that is compassionate and caring.

How do I ask her whats wrong?

Instead, ask gently, with genuine interest, so that she is instantly comfortable sharing what’s on her mind. Don’t just say “did I do something wrong?”, try to be less demanding, with something like, “I’ve noticed something’s a little off, have I said something or done something that hurt you?”

Is it rude to say what’s your problem?

What’s your problem may sound rude, and so I wouldn’t use it in writing to avoid misunderstanding. But in speech, it will depends entirely on expression and tone of voice: “Hey, sunshine! What’s your problem?”, shouted at a stranger, is looking for an argument.

What to say when he asks what’s wrong?

What is the best response when someone asks, “what’s wrong?” and it’s none of their business? You could answer honestly and say “I don’t feel like talking about it” and firmly change the subject. Or you could lie, say “I’m good” and change the subject.

When a girl ask if you’re OK?

#1 You can say “Yes, I’m fine, thanks,” even if you’re not OK, and be done with it. #2 You can be honest about how you feel and open up to someone who may not really want to hear about your problems. Then you run the risk of that person avoiding you in the future.

What does whats wrong mean?

used for asking someone who looks ill or sad to tell you what problem they have. You look terrible – what’s wrong?

How do you properly answer a question?

Follow these three steps to answer questions effectively:LISTEN TO THE ENTIRE QUESTION. Many people ask rambling questions which often turn into statements about what is important to them. PAUSE, USE SILENCE TO THINK AND DECIDE: • ANSWER ONLY WHAT IS ASKED AND STOP. Focus on the listeners’ needs.